Case Studies

Ganglion

(Cystic hygroma)

 

Ganglion cysts are noncancerous lumps that most commonly develop along the tendons or joints of your wrists or hands. They also may occur in the ankles and feet, are typically round or oval and are filled with a jellylike fluid.

Small ganglion cysts can be pea-sized, while larger ones can be around an inch (2.5 centimeters) in diameter. Ganglion cysts are usually painless but can become painful if they press on a nearby nerve. Also, their location can sometimes interfere with joint movement.

No one knows exactly what causes them to develop. They grow out of a joint or the lining of a tendon, looking like a tiny water balloon on a stalk, and seem to occur when the tissue surrounding a joint or a tendon bulges out of place. Inside the cyst is a thick lubricating fluid similar to that found in joints or around tendons.

If you are a woman aged 20-40 years, suffer from arthritis or you’ve had a joint injury, you are at a greater risk of developing a ganglion.

As a treatment option, your doctor might pop or drain the fluid from the cyst using a needle through a process called aspiration, though chances of recurrence are high. If this doesn’t work, the doctor may remove the cyst and the stalk that attaches it to the joint or tendon through arthroscopic surgery. Rarely, the surgery can injure the surrounding nerves, blood vessels or tendons. And the cyst can recur, even after surgery.

Here’s a case that responded well to Homoeopathic oral medication and got rid of this nearly 2.5x3cm cyst without going under a surgeons’ knife.

Before

After

 

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